According to CareerBuilder, two-thirds of workers say they’ve accepted a job only to realize it was not a good fit, with half of them quitting in the first six months. That’s an exhausting, unproductive, unintended consequence of the surge in hiring. From a company’s viewpoint:

  1. Keep to schedules as much as feasible and avoid drawn out interviews
  2. Carefully orchestrate group interviews and pay attention to group dynamics
  3. Honestly share as much as possible about your company’s values, culture, and commitments
  4. Be aware of conflicting answers from others in your organization
  5. If you change the scope of the position, let the interviewee know beforehand
  6. Make an offer sincerely, with no ultimatums attached

These and other red flags can ruin the best hiring plans. An additional tactic we’ve found very successful is to use objective testing and extensive background checks to measure cognitive skills, assess personality traits and cultural fit, and validate resumes contents (i.e., employment history, academic credentials, license and certificate validation, etc.) so that the candidate interviews can be maximized to learn more about the candidate’s goals and interest, our goals and objectives, the performance objectives of the given role, and other value-added dialogue versus each interviewer revisiting the candidate’s job history and prior details. After all, each interview is a mutual discovery opportunity. Please reach out to me to share your recruiting challenges.

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